ABC Book Әлифба

How Tatar writing developed and why the letters Ә, Ө, Ү, Җ и Һ were chosen for this series.
How a few very different artists interpreted traditional Tatar
motifs.
39 Stroiteley Prospekt
37 Stroiteley Prospekt,
35 Stroiteley Prospect


Artist
MAP
RU
EN
TAT
Чем для татарской культуры является традиционное пожелание счастья «Котлы булсын!»
Как это пожелание стало произведением современного искусства
Роман Kreemos (Подольск, Россия)
Белоглазова, 46
ABC Book
Әлифба
Context
The five walls of the three buildings along Stroiteley Avenue are illustrated pages of an ABC book with letters from the Tatar alphabet Ә, Ө, Ү, Җ, Һ and the words that begin with them. And another painting is a work devoted to the ABC book itself, a book by which the basics of literacy are studied.
Process
The series "ABC book" ("Әлифба" or, in English tranliteration, "Elifba") is dedicated to the history of Tatar writing. The first two letters of the Arabic alphabet are elif and ba. They make up the word elifba — "ABC book" (or "alphabet": as with the equivalent Russian word, this word can mean a set of letters that make up the alphabet, and a book by which the alphabet is
taught). Although Tatar writing has existed in three different writing systems (several versions of Arabic writing, Latin, and later also Cyrillic) over the centuries, the word elifba retained its meaning.

In the 10th century, the ancestors of Kazan Tatars converted to Islam and with this new religion came an alphabet based on Arabic. It was used until 1920 and had the name Iske imle, that is, the "old writing". Then for a short time it was replaced by Yana imle ("new writing"), also based on Arabic but with some modernization from the Soviet government (some letters and signs were removed with additional ones added). In 1927, another reform awaited Tatar: the Latin alphabet — the Yanalif ("new alphabet"), which also did not last long, was compiled. In 1939, the Cyrillic alphabet began to be used; it remains in official use to this day.

In the original version of the Cyrillic alphabet for Tatar, there were not enough letters that could convey all the sounds that exist in the language, so letters of the expanded Cyrillic alphabet — Ә, Ө, Ү, Җ, Ң, Һ — were added. They became the starting point for the project.

The idea for the series arose during a research trip of the curatorial group to the museum of the village of Elhovo, where they were shown the old Soviet alphabet primers. The best examples of book graphics provided the visual basis of the series. In particular, the famous "ABCs in Pictures" by Alexandre Benois from 1904.
Anna Nistratova
Project curator, consultant on the
choosing of artists.
ABC books from the Elkhovo village museum
Curatorial group examines building façades for possible mural locations.
39 Prospekt Stroiteley
ABC Book
Әлифба
39 PROSPEKT STROITELEY
ABC Book
Әлифба
Artist
Dmitry Fatum (Kiev)
Artist
This is the title work of the entire ABC book series (Elifba) — in it Dmitry Fatum created a simple and understandable image of how a native language preserves the memory of generations. Against the backdrop of a typical Tatar landscape, a teacher and students have settled around the alphabet. The teacher's costume references Tatar educators of the XIX century, while the children's clothes are completely modern. A flower of knowledge grows from the book. The vignette at the top of the book page was created based on a traditional Tatar ornament.
Work from the Art United Us Festival. Kiev, 2016.
Having received a classical academic education at the Taras Shevchenko Art School,where he studied easel painting, Fatum began to paint on the streets. Then, exhibitions in galleries were added to street art — the artist did not completely abandon the canvas. His first solo exhibition was held in Odessa in 2011. Now Dmitry works as a muralist.
39 Stroiteley Prospect
Grow
Үстерү
Natalya Pastukhova (Ekaterinburg)
39 Stroiteley Prospect
Grow
Үстерү
Natalya Pastukhova (Ekaterinburg)
Artist
Natalya Pastukhova (Ekaterinburg)
Artist
Yekaterinburg artist Natalya Pastukhova from got the letter Ү and the word үsterү ("grow"). A pair of horses framed by a vignette of flowers based on Tatar embroidery is an allegory of a young family that cultivates their feelings.

"I decided to interpret this word through the image of a horse. Horses are often significant heroes for the Tatar culture, participants in many myths and legends. With the help of horses and floral patterns, I wanted to show that you can grow not only flowers and plants, but also warm feelings in yourself", says the artist.
Cotton candy stand in Ekaterinburg, 2018
Natalya Pastukhova is not only an illustrator and designer (she graduated from the undergraduate program at the University of Huddersfield and studied Industrial Design at the Ural State University of Architecture and Art), but is also a teacher. She oversees various children's programs, teaches book and magazines publishing, make costumes of fantastic creatures, and draws with children with disabilities. The artist has been engaged in street art for a long time: her porfolio includes murals of commercial and residential buildings in Yekaterinburg and Perm, on the Yamal Peninsula, in Novotroitsk, Novosibirsk and many other places. Natalia is also involved in branding and space design. Her work includes the IKEA bistro and parking lot in Finland.
Sketches
37 Prospect Stroiteliey
Ability
Һөнәр
Güzel Garipova (Kazan)
37 Prospect Stroiteliey
Ability
Һөнәр
Güzel Garipova (Kazan)
Artist
Güzel Garipova (Kazan)
Artist
Illustrator Güzel Garipova got the word Һeнeр ("ability"). In her work, she combined a modern skatepark with a traditional Tatar holiday. In her drawing there is a heap of kids, where each child performs tasks typical for competitions at the Sabantuy festival: children walk along an inclined log, climb up to the top of the pillar behind a rooster, fight with bags, run around with a chicken egg in a spoon, engage in national Tatar wrestling kuresh, cut threads blindfolded and dance.

For our project, Güzel worked for the first time in a monumental format, and the illustration for the ABC book is her first work on the mural, finalized by the St. Petersburg graffiti writers Nikita Dusto and Yegor Shen.
Hay kizi Zohre, Yoldiz Minnullina. Published by Yulbasma, 2018.
Güzel Garipova — illustrator, designer and artist from Kazan. She illustrates children's books, works with fairy tales and Tatar folk legends, publishes board games and guides, teaches adults and children. Güzel often works on the whole book — from illustrations to typesetting. Recently, she designed a collection of fairy tales by Abdullah Alish and a fairy tale by Yoldiz Minnullina "Hay kizi Zohre" based on a Tatar legend about a girl saved by the stars from her stepmother.
Working on the mural. Almetyevsk, 2018.
37 Stroiteley Prospect
Home
Өй
Aleksey Kislow (Sevastopol)
37 Stroiteley Prospect
Home
Өй
Aleksey Kislow (Sevastopol)
Artist
Aleksey Kislow (Sevastopol)
Artist
Alexey Kislow worked on the letter Ө and the word өй ("house"). A family home is the basis of life for all nationalities living in Tatarstan. Alexey depicted a dream of a large and prosperous house where several generations live.The work used the architectural features of the village house, including decor elements and colors typical of the Almetyevsk region.
"Reality" and "Imperceptible Display"
Aleksey Kislow, an artist from Sevastopol. Kislow studied at the N. S. Samokish Crimean Art College and in the early 1990s began to work in graffiti. His work gradually began to take on a tendency towards surrealism, and among the recurring images in his works one can distinguish a house, so the choice of a word for this project is not accidental. He has been engaged in monumental painting for almost ten years, participating in projects in Ukraine, Belarus, Russia, Germany, France, Poland, the USA, Finland, China and Brazil.
Working on the mural. Almetyevsk, 2018.
35 Stroiteley Prospect
Earth
Җир
Roman Muratkin (Serpukhov)
35 Stroiteley Prospect
Earth
Җир
Roman Muratkin (Serpukhov)
Artist
For the letter Җ and the word җир ("earth"), Roman Muratkin depicted a scene from the Tatar rural holiday — Sabantuy. A festive procession led by an accordion player marks the end of field work. Important stages of the agricultural calendar, such as planting or harvesting, often ended with holidays. Despite the fact that they are no longer celebrated everywhere, they still remain an important part of peasant life. Previously, such holidays were ritualized in nature and were distributed throughout the territory of Tatarstan and Russia — they thanked the land and asked to be generous. In his work, Roman also managed to show an important detail of the Almetyevsk landscape — the silhouette of an oil rig in the hills, precisely the type that surround the city itself.

According to the artist, the very object on which the image will be located always plays an important role for him, since the place sets the tone and character. Another criterion is the
coloristic interaction of the medium and subject matter. They should complement each other without entering into dissonance with the surrounding space. He also tried to implement these principles while working on "Earth".
Pianoforte. Pasta bar "Pastarama". Nizhny Novgorod, 2017
Roman Muratkin, from Serpukhov, near Moscow, began to work with street space as a graffiti artist of gradually increasing scale. He defines his current style as neodeformism. Its distinctive feature is the creative reworking of the proportions of the depicted objects, elements and figures for the sake of plastic changes in the environment with which the artist works. Talking about his work, Roman says that he likes to "break the idea of correct proportions and academically verified laws of the anatomical idea of the structure of man."

Roman's graphics can be seen not only on the external 30-meter walls of residential buildings in St. Petersburg or a prison wall in Brazil. He works indoors as well. So, several years ago, he painted the interior of the restaurant "Pastarama" in Nizhny Novgorod.
Roman Muratkin (Serpukhov)
Artist
35 Prospect Stroiteley
Fairy Tale
Әкият
Rustam Qbic (Kazan)
35 Prospect Stroiteley
Fairy Tale
Әкият
Rustam Qbic (Kazan)
Artist
Rustam Qbic (Kazan)
Artist
The artist Rustam Salemgaraev (Qbic) visualized the letter Ә and the word әkiyat ("fairy tale"). He depicted those transformations that happen to a person after the birth of children.

Although Rustam's murals have long been found in Russian cities and around the world (in Turkey, Cyprus, Italy and Ukraine), "Fairy Tale" was the first painting that he made in his native Tatarstan.
"Mind Games" in Gdansk (Poland). 2015
Rustam Salemgaraev (Qbic) was born and raised in the city of Kamsky Polyany and graduated from the
Feshina Art College in Kazan. He practice lettering for a short time, then began to paint murals, which now make up the main pool of his work. Rustam
creates for them his own poetic world, full of philosophical images.
Sketch
Address
"ABC Book"
All objects
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